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Dean Richards
Building control officer
Asked a question last year

What safeguards do you use to avoid mistakes in drawing a plan?

What safeguards do you use to avoid mistakes in drawing a plan?

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What safeguards do you use to avoid mistakes in drawing a plan?

Common mistakes we should avoid while drawing a plan are given below;

  • always put all basic dimensions  at least three decimal places and be boxed
  • All the extension lines of dimensions should not be in touch with the model sided
  • One dimension line should not coincide with another dimension line
  • short dimensions should be placed near to the model and long dimension should be placed away from the model
Terry Collins
Sustainability consultant

The safeguards which are used to avoid mistakes in drawing a plan are as follows :-

  • Take care on basic dimensions and keep it in three decimal places.
  • External lines should not coincide model sides.
  • One dimension line should not touch another dimension line.
  • Dont hide the dimension line as they cannot be inspected.
  • The electrical ports and their angles should be identified.
  • Dimension of model should be placed outside of the model.
Henry Newman
Water resource engineer

Hi,

Nice to read your answer to your question.

I would like to add some significant mistakes that freshers civil engineers/architectures make while drawing plan

  1. The plan is not co-ordinated – In many construction companies, due to lack of coordination between architectural drawing with electrical and electric drawing with mechanical for electric wires. Conduits, etc., which leads to a massive problem in the forward lane.
  2. Incomplete Plan: If an inexperienced engineer is going to draft complex building structures, many issues arise. Complete construction plans consist of multiple sheets, including architectural, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, civil engineering, structural engineering, and possibly other disciplines. The more complex the project, the more sheets of drawings there will be. When the plans are not complete, it increases the risk for the lender.
  3. Detail lacking: To reduce time, some architects/engineers will skip some of the drawings’ details. Rather than drawing the details of a roof edge dimensions or a window detail, they’ll add vague notes about what that portion of the construction will contain. That leads to significant problems for site engineers and results in error in structure. Once the contractor is on-site, and they have to attempt to interpret the puzzling notes into actual construction, they will generally have questions about exactly how that is to be done.
  4. The wrong set of PCR values:  The planning process produces various progress sets of drawings, from the original conceptual design drawings to progress collections of construction drawings. Ultimately, the “for construction” set that the contractor will use to build the building.